Revolution and Genocide: On the Origins of the Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust

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University of Chicago Press, 1996 - History - 363 pages
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In a study that compares the major attempts at genocide in world history, Robert Melson creates a sophisticated framework that links genocide to revolution and war. He focuses on the plights of Jews after the fall of Imperial Germany and of Armenians after the fall of the Ottoman as well as attempted genocides in the Soviet Union and Cambodia. He argues that genocide often is the end result of a complex process that starts when revolutionaries smash an old regime and, in its wake, try to construct a society that is pure according to ideological standards.
 

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Contents

Overview and Major Themes
1
PA RT I Armenians and Jews under the Old Regimes in
41
Antisemitism and the Upwardly
70
The Failure of the Antisemitic Parties in Imperial
101
Armenians and Jews under Revolutionary Regimes
137
The German Revolution and the Rise of the Nazi Party
171
The Revolution and the War against the Jews
204
Conclusion
245
Revolution and Genocide
258
Notes
287
Bibliography
335
Index
351
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